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Résumé Writing 101 (from laurenconrad.com)

Oh, finding a job.  We’re back at one of my favorite topics, because it’s a skill that everyone should continually practice, in my opinion – résumé writing.  It’s not fun.  It’s not glamorous.  But it might just get you that job that you’ve always wanted and have been dreaming about. So, here are Rachel Rosenbloom’s tips for writing a killer résumé, as posted on Lauren Conrad’s website:

  1. Font first.  This is most important, because an employer can take a glance at your resume and notice the font.  Go for clean, crisp, and easy to read over flowy and loopy.  And, good God, don’t use Comic Sans.  I believe I used Calibri for my résumé.  And be sure your name is bigger than everything else on the page, so that you stand out from a crowd.
  2. Formatting matters.  Make sure everything is the same font, same color, and, for the most part, the same size.  Then, split it into sections.  Mine includes my name, my contact information, my work experience, my education background, and then my skills.  It also always helps to include “References available upon request” at the bottom.
  3. One and done.  Keep your résumé to a single page.  No questions asked on this one.  No one wants to have to turn it over or go to the next page just to read what you’ve done.
  4. Keep it relevant.  Only include work experiences that are relevant to the job or field you are applying for.  This will not only highlight the important things to your potential employer, but will also help you keep things to a page in total length.  This is crucial for someone like me – I’m in the middle of a career shift, so I have science jobs on one résumé, and writing and editing jobs on another.  And that time I was a Wedding Consultant at David’s Bridal for a summer?  Not included on anything.
  5. Text only.  Facebook and LinkedIn are for pictures.  Your resume should only include text.  And trust me, they will be checking your Facebook, your LinkedIn, and other social media accounts that they can find.  But that is a topic for a whole different blog post.
  6. Contact me.  Be sure to include, at the very least, a phone number and email address that you can be reached at, assuming you’ll be called in for an interview.  Another suggestion – if you have a work email, don’t include that on your résumé.  If that’s your only email address, Gmail, YahooMail, and several others are free of charge.  It will just make things less complicated.
  7. Cover it off.  If you’re serious about the job you’re applying for, attach a cover letter to your résumé.  Make sure you highlight why you’re perfect for the job, your relevant skills, and that you’re excited about it.  It will help, believe me.

And, as a personal suggestion, don’t print it on pink paper and spritz it with perfume.  It may work for Elle Woods, but I’m not sure most hiring managers would find it amusing.

Good luck out there!

-A.

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